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From the Health Office!

If your child gets up at 6:30 am, he/she should be in bed by 8:30. 

Mary Sheedy Kurcinka, a child development and edu-cation expert discusses how lack of sleep affects the whole family in Sleepless in America: Practical Strate-gies to Help Your Family get the Sleep it Deserves. 

She writes that a young child who is chronically sleep-deprived has trouble managing his emotions. He might have an explosive temper, easily hurt feelings, or a lack of patience. He may be clumsy and accident-prone, and will also be more wired and frenzied in play. An over-tired child in school may have trouble focusing and paying attention in class. He may become forgetful and make silly mistakes. He also may talk excessively and constantly bug you, siblings, and classmates — all of which are ways he is trying to stimulate himself and regain focus. In social situations, an overtired child might have more conflicts with other kids, or be bossy, demanding, and not open to guidance. 

If this sounds familiar, insist on an earlier bedtime. 

http://www.scholastic.com/parents/resources/article/ parent-child/sleep-better-better-behavior

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Sick Day Guidelines

These are some of the examples of when your child should be kept home:

  • Active vomiting

  • Active diarrhea – three or more times in six hours

  • The beginning of a cold/cough/runny nose [This is especially important for those who are unable to cover their cough]

  • Extreme tiredness and/or lack of appetite

  • Fever with headache, body aches, earache, sore throat

  • Undiagnosed or unknown rash (a rash that has not been seen or treated by a health care provider)

  • Any of the above symptoms with fever or chills

  • Untreated skin conditions such as impetigo, lice, scabies, or similar conditions

  • If antibiotic treatment is needed, your child should remain home for the first full 24 hours of medication (e.g., if your child has three doses per day ordered, then three doses must be given before the child returns to school)

If any symptoms change, worsen or don’t get better please call your health care provider.

Your child can return to school when he or she is well enough to take part in school and has had no fever for 24 hours without medication (acetaminophen, Tylenol®, etc.).

Health Room Staff
Contact Debra Guest  Debra Guest (505) 877-4799 ex: 51408 Health Assistant

Health Information

Medicaid Services

We are here to help you!  If you need Medicaid services, the APS School Based Medicaid Office can usually get it done in two days or less.  Their phone number is 855-9820 and they speak Spanish. 

They are not full time so LEAVE A MESSAGE – they are great about calling you back.